Apr

02

Fort McHenry Friday Lunchtime Virtual History Series

Zoom

02 April 2021 - 30 April 2021

Baltimore, 1861 – Insurrection and Consequences: a 4-part virtual history series produced by The National Park Service and Friends of Fort McHenry

Take a break from your day and enjoy your lunch while learning about some important local history right from your computer.  Join National Park Service Rangers and scholars from throughout Maryland on Fridays from 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM throughout the month of April as we explore stories of some of the most critical moments in the history of the United States and Baltimore.

Friends of Fort McHenry and Living Classrooms are proud to help make this virtual programming series possible through a generous donation from the George S. Rich Family Foundation.  www.friendsoffortmchenry.org

Event Schedule

WASHINGTON D.C., 1861—CAPITAL CRISIS
Friday, April 2, 2021 | 1:00pm – 2:00pm
“The capital can’t be taken! It can’t be taken!” –Brevet Lieutenant General Winfield Scott, April 1861
The nation’s capital was surrounded and under threat as President Abraham Lincoln settled into his first month as commander-in-chief. The city lacked soldiers and defensive measures to guard it from a rebel incursion. The fall of Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor in April 1861 sparked Civil War. Lincoln’s call for 75,000 volunteers to suppress the rebellion further inflamed tensions around the country, especially the capital as Maryland and Virginia seem destined to secede from the Union. Reinforcements in the form of the Regular Army regiments were recalled from their posts in the Western frontier to help secure the capital. Civilian volunteers, buoyed by martial fervor, enlisted for 90-days and were also sent to Washington. The capital was in a crisis. Would troops arrive in time to protect the beleaguered capital? Join the National Park Service as we explore Washington D.C. at war. We will examine the critical months following to the Election of 1860 as the Federal government and army prepared to defend the city, and focus on the critical month of April 1861 as hostile forces aim to seize Washington.
Register Here

AFTER PRATT STREET: MARYLAND MY MARYLAND, FREE BLACKS, AND UNITED STATES COLORED TROOPS

Friday, April 9, 2021 | 1:00pm – 2:00pm

Following the Pratt Street Riot in 1861, native Baltimoreans in the city and around the United States had a variety of different reactions. For some, like James Ryder Randall, the events in April of 1861 were a sign that Maryland should join the confederacy. For others, like Black Baltimoreans, the Pratt Street Riot and resulting political polarization in the state led to high recruitment of Maryland United States Colored Troop Regiments. Join Alexander Lothstein of the Maryland Center for History and Culture as he explores the effects the Pratt Street Riot had on the writing of Maryland, My Maryland and the recruitment of United States Colored Troops in 1863.
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WALKING THE TIGHTROPE—JOHN GARRETT AND THE B&O IN THE SPRING AND SUMMER OF 1861My Meeting

Friday, April 16, 2021 | 1:00pm – 2:00pm

The B&O Railroad found itself in a precarious position in the Spring of 1861. It was the only railroad in the East that crossed between the two shores of the Potomac River and would become the only Eastern road that would traverse the border between the United States and the Confederacy. In the early days of the war the railroad became an important part of the dance between the Confederacy and Maryland as the state considered secession. John Garrett found himself trying to keep his railroad running and in the good graces of the Lincoln Administration, the City of Baltimore, the State of Maryland and the government of the newly seceded Commonwealth of Virginia. This presentation will talk about what happened during those crucial weeks and how Garrett and the railroad were impacted by the decisions made during that time.

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Friday, April 30, 2021 | 1:00pm – 2:00pm

“INDIGNANT, EXCITED, ALARMED”—CLARA BARTON AND THE AFTERMATH OF THE PRATT STREET RIOT

After the bloodshed in Baltimore, wounded soldiers of the Sixth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry made their way to Washington in need of medical care. Join historian Jake Wynn of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine as he explores the experiences of Clara Barton in the aftermath of the Pratt Street Riot.
Register Here

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